Cost, Accuracy, and Subjective Fairness in Legal Information Technology: A Response to Technological Due Process Critics

December
2016
Jay Thornton
The United States spends substantially more as a percentage of GDP on legal services than most other countries. Simultaneously, various indicators suggest this outsized spending does not result in public perceptions of greater fairness or justice. While the digital automation of legal work offers the potential to help address this problematic paradigm, the legal academy’s reception of automation in law has been critical. This Note responds to these criticisms by showing the demonstrable objective and subjective fairness benefits that legal automation can achieve—all while reducing costs.
 
This article appears in the December 2016 Issue: Volume 91, Number 6
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